7 am
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6 pm
7 pm
Wednesday - September 25th
Wednesday - September 25th
Registration
7:00 am - 8:30 am
Social

Registration opens at 7:00 am.

Breakfast Buffet and Plenary
8:30 am - 10:15 am
HSABC welcome and guest speaker
Plenary

Kick off the HSABC conference with a breakfast and opening address!

Tour #1 | Richmond: Approaches to Addressing Homelessness
9:00 am - 12:00 pm
Tour

Join this tour to learn more about innovative approaches to addressing homelessness in Richmond. Along with a guide and other delegates, this tour will provide the opportunity to learn from and share ideas with a variety of providers. The tour will include site visits across the housing continuum, including emergency shelter, temporary supportive housing building, and permanent housing with a co-located social enterprise and other community agencies.

** Please note space is limited**

Harm Reduction Perspectives from the Front Line | ALL
10:30 am - 12:00 pm
Panelists TBD
Panel Discussion

On Thursday, April 14, 2016, BC’s provincial health officer declared a public health emergency in response to the rise in drug overdoses and deaths. While efforts have been made to support a response, Opioid- and other drug-related overdose deaths continue to increase becoming a significant cause of mortality in communities across Canada.

This engaging panel discussion will bring forward expertise from a wide range of perspectives. Participants will share personal reflections, effective interventions, policy recommendations and evidence-based strategies for supporting a harm reduction approach.

Problem Solving Interventions and Shelter Diversion | LEADERSHIP
10:30 am - 12:00 pm
with Alynn Gausvik MSW, Sr. Director of Engagement, LA Family Housing
Workshop

This session will provide an overview of problem-solving interventions, which can aid in diverting households from an experience of homelessness. Diversion explores and builds upon households skills, interests, and natural community resources, which are essential to resolving any crisis. LA is experiencing a housing and homelessness crisis - with just under 60 000 people on the streets during our last point in time count – 45 000 people (75%) are unsheltered.

Designed as part of access to homeless and housing services – problem-solving has become core to diverting households from literal homelessness in LA county. This is a paradigm shift from how to assess and prioritize the needs of people with a housing crisis. It is grounded in research on trauma-informed care and resiliency, housing first, restorative justice, and harm reduction. This workshop is focused on how leadership can leverage existing program structures and community resources to implement the minimal programmatic changes. It has been recognized as a best practice by the National Alliance to End Homelessness and there is recent data-driven evidence of its success in Los Angeles and New York.

Alynn Gausvik MSW (She/Her/Hers)

Alynn has been working in homeless services for almost 10 years. She is currently the Senior Director of Engagement at LA Family Housing – An internationally recognized non-profit that provides direct client services, in addition to developing subsidized supportive housing units in LA County. Prior to moving to Los Angeles Alynn was working to integrate BC housing outreach and rent subsidies, with new Federal housing first funding in Burnaby BC.

She completed her MSW at the University of British Columbia. Her internship and thesis focused on youth hidden homelessness. Prior to her MSW, she was a case manager at a family emergency shelter in downtown Calgary. Currently, she oversees urban and rural street outreach services, drop-in/access centers for families and single individuals, and regional system development for the service area. Her passion is in building systems that stay grounded in reality.

Working with Compassion Fatigue | ALL
10:30 am - 12:00 pm
with Amanda Thiessen
Workshop

This workshop will help you explore how to shift your relationship with the symptoms of compassion fatigue. The workshop facilitator will help you develop a personalized care plan and a practice that will keep you hopeful in the work. There will also be some space to shape the workshop as we go and focus on whatever comes up during the group time.

Amanda Thiessen

Amanda Thiessen is a coach and an educator who works with frontline workers, administrators, and managers to support hopefulness and wellbeing in trauma exposed workplaces. Although Amanda has worked in the nonprofit sector for 20 years, holds 2 Bachelor degrees and a Masters degree, her greatest accomplishments remain being a loving partner, a devoted mother and a good friend.

Lunch Buffet and Plenary with Keynote Linda Coates
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Speaking of Violence: Creating Safety And Social Justice Through Accurate Descriptions
Plenary

Violence is one of the most urgent issue of our times. Yet professionals receive little training about violence or how to describe it. Victims of violence report that professionals and others dramatically erode safety and hopes of social justice when they respond to victims based upon widespread myths about violence, victims, and perpetrators. Linda will illustrate the importance of accurately describing violence to the creation of safety and social justice.

Linda Coates

Linda Coates, Ph.D., is a Professor in the Dept. of Psychology, Okanagan College. Linda is a consultant and researcher who has received international acclaim from researchers, legal and mental health professionals, and victims’ advocates for her work on the connection between violence and language in diverse settings. She has worked closely with Allan Wade and Nick Todd to develop Response-Based Practice, which is a theoretical framework for understanding human behavior. Response-Based Practice has been extensively applied nationally and internationally in contexts where people are experiencing adversity, especially violence. Linda and colleagues at the Centre for Response-Based Practice work with many organizations in Canada and internationally to improve institutional and professional responses in cases of violence.

Tour #2 | Vancouver: Approaches to Addressing Homelessness
1:00 pm - 5:15 pm
Tour

Join this tour to learn more about Vancouver-based creative responses to homelessness. This guided tour will generate great conversation and knowledge sharing while you network with fellow delegates and Vancouver service providers to spark ideas on how to support individuals and families experiencing homelessness. The tour will include site visits to housing and shelters with a focus on youth, women and Indigenous people. Learn about policies and strategies to support individuals dealing with substance use issues, isolation and a desire for meaningful engagement and wellness.

** Please note space is limited**

Why Do I Pick These Men? | Lessons of Disguise, Violence, and Resistance in Little Red Riding Hood | ALL
2:15 pm - 5:15 pm
with Linda Coates, PhD and Shelley Bonnah PhD
Workshop

In Little Red Riding Hood our ancestors have woven a tale of instruction and warning that conveys a sophisticated understanding of violence, perpetrator actions, and victim resistance into a straight forward narrative of that violence. In this workshop, Linda and Shelly will use Little Red Riding Hood to show how perpetrators disguise violence to lure and entrap victims. They will then build on knowledge of these disguises to present accurate understandings of violence, perpetrators, and victims. They will then contrast these accurate understandings with modern understandings that blame and pathologize victims, minimize violence, and excuse perpetrators. In doing so, they will present their framework (In-Dignity, Response Based Practice) and provide tools for practitioners, victims, parents, and others to better understand violence, align themselves with victims, and support perpetrators in ceasing to use violence.

Linda Coates

Linda Coates, Ph.D., is a Professor in the Dept. of Psychology, Okanagan College. Linda is a consultant and researcher who has received international acclaim from researchers, legal and mental health professionals, and victims’ advocates for her work on the connection between violence and language in diverse settings. She has worked closely with Allan Wade and Nick Todd to develop Response-Based Practice, which is a theoretical framework for understanding human behavior. Response-Based Practice has been extensively applied nationally and internationally in contexts where people are experiencing adversity, especially violence. Linda and colleagues at the Centre for Response-Based Practice work with many organizations in Canada and internationally to improve institutional and professional responses in cases of violence.

Shelly Bonnah


Shelly Bonnah is a family therapist, clinical supervisor and organizational consultant from Kamloops, BC. As a therapist, Shelly works with children, youth and adults who have experienced violence and other forms of adversity, with a special interest in victims of institutionalized violence. Her doctoral research focused on children’s responses and resistance to violence--specifically understanding their behaviour in context, the nature of social interactions with young people, the connection between violence and mutualizing language, and the social responses that they receive. Prior to opening the Centre for the Centre for Response-Based Practice in the Interior of BC, Shelly was the Chief Operating Officer of a multi-service, non-profit organization. In this setting, Shelly applied the principles of Reponses-Based ideas to leadership and other organizational priorities such as policies and human relations challenges. Shelly was also a foster parent for just over 15 years and had over 30 children in her family over that time. Currently, Shelly works with other professionals who are interested in Response-Based Practice as a clinical supervisor and an organizational consultant. She also teaches in the Master of Counselling program through City University of Seattle and the Master of Education program at Thompson Rivers University.

BC Housing Session Pt. 1 : Partnering for Tenants through STEP Pilot | ALL
2:15 pm - 3:45 pm
with Will Valenciano, BC Housing and Liza Jimenez, City of Vancouver
Information Session

In this session hear about a partnership developed to support successes for tenants. In Vancouver, two levels of Government, a health authority and Streetohome Foundation, partnered to ensure supportive housing units are available to people most in need and that tenants who wish to live independently are supported to transition into more appropriate housing.

Panelists:

Liza Jimenez – Liza is a Social Planner with the Affordable Housing Programs and Homelessness Services at the City of Vancouver. She has worked for the City of Vancouver for over a decade mostly working on moving the City forward on homelessness and housing affordability issues. She has worked on housing policy that supports some of our most vulnerable residents, like protection of SROs and rental housing, the delivery of new housing and shelters to house our homeless residents as well as affordable housing projects across the City. Most recently she has worked with the Province, non-profit housing societies and the public on delivering over 600 units of temporary modular housing in the City. She is local to Vancouver and has a Master’s in Public Policy from Simon Fraser University.

Will Valenciano – Will is a Senior Manager of Coordinated Access and Assessment with BC Housing, Orange Hall Office in Vancouver’s Down Town Eastside. His area of work is in supportive housing and developing a coordinated systems approach for access along the housing continuum. Will received his Bachelor of Social Work from University of British Columbia and Masters of Health Studies from Athabasca University. Will is a registered social worker with BCCSW.

Practical Tools to Build Indigenous Cultural Competency | ALL
2:15 pm - 5:15 pm
with MVAEC, Kevin Barlow
Workshop

This session is part of a capacity-building series offered by the Metro Vancouver Aboriginal Executive Council (MVAEC). It is best taken after reviewing a previous webinar (link will be provided) that contextualizes historical impacts such as disease, warfare and Residential Schools. It will focus on practical tools service providers can use to self-assess where they are at in understanding the needs of Indigenous clients. It will reframe some of these issues, so the participant can begin to understand how better to approach Indigenous people who access your services and examine how your agency can consider decolonized approaches.

Kevin Barlow

Kevin Barlow is Mi’kmaq from Indian Island First Nation in New Brunswick. He now resides in Vancouver and is Chief Executive Officer of both the Metro Vancouver Aboriginal Executive Council (MVAEC) which is described as a Think and Lead Organization and the newly formed Metro Vancouver Indigenous Services Society (MVISS). MVAEC currently has 23 urban Indigenous member agencies which make up a majority of Indigenous groups serving an estimated 70,000 urban Indigenous population in Metro Vancouver.

Barlow has worked at the local, regional, national and international levels. A large portion of his career has been in the health sector and all of his career has been working for and with Indigenous people. He has also operated his own consulting firm for the last twenty-years supporting the Indigenous non-profit sector to build capacity.

He has held over $3M in community-based research grants, delving into areas of residential schooling, sexual violence, HIV and Indigenous women; substance use in the Indigenous community; cultural competency, and more. He has developed policies and strategies in a broad range of areas.

For over 16 years Kevin has held senior executive posts, including Chief Administrative Officer in his home community where he reduced the number of people on social assistance from about 40 to 11 in under four years through community economic development. One project he developed was an aquaculture (oyster) farm which now employs 6 fulltime seasonal workers and generates over $100K a year for the First Nation.

BC Housing Session Pt.2 : HIFIS Information Session | ALL
3:45 pm - 5:15 pm
with Randy Sarju and Danielle Scott, BC Housing
Information Session

This session will provide an overview of how BC Housing and its shelter & outreach partners are using HIFIS. BC Housing will cover topics such as HIFIS training, reporting, quality assurance, and will also include a Q&A session.

Randy Sarju, Business Support Manager, BC Housing

Randy has been with BC Housing for over 15 years and providing database support to shelter and outreach service providers throughout BC since June 2010.

Danielle Scott, Director, Supportive Housing & Programs, BC Housing

Danielle has been with BC Housing since 2007 and is the Director of Supportive Housing & Programs (Acting). A provincial program role, Danielle manages programs for individuals who are experiencing or are at risk of homelessness, including emergency shelters and outreach programs, supportive housing, and subsidized assisted living for seniors.

Social Reception
5:15 pm - 7:00 pm
Social

Join delegates at the end of our first day for a complimentary drink and canapes during our social reception.

7 am
8 am
9 am
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12 pm
1 pm
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5 pm
6 pm
7 pm
Thursday - September 26
Thursday - September 26
Registration
7:00 am - 8:00 am

Registration opens at 7:00 am.

Breakfast Buffet and HSABC Annual General Meeting
8:00 am - 9:30 am
Social

Come and join HSABC's Annual General Meeting. Learn about what has been going on with HSABC over the previous year, and don't forget to stay for the prize draws!

Managing Hostile Interactions
8:30 am - 12:00 pm
with Kerry Palmer **Limited spaces available**
Training

Service providers are aware of the challenges of dealing with upset, angry, frustrated and confused clients. Increasingly, one is presented with personally intimidating, hurtful hostile behaviour. Hostile incidents are clearly on the increase; dealing effectively with hostile individuals takes energy and the careful application of a specific range of skills. Unfortunately, it is much easier to intensify hostility than to defuse it. This 3.5 hour workshop will provide participants with proven strategies for managing hostile interactions in a manner that dramatically increases the likelihood of constructive resolution for all parties.

Principles and Values for This Course:
• The purpose of our workshops is to create change and action, not just knowledge
Experiential learning will be the foundation of the workshop
• Learning will be personal, relevant, and meaningful i.e. it will be about the practical issues and concerns that participants have with respect to their own workplace, work issues, and skills

Objectives:
Participants in this workshop will:
• Define hostility and examine its forms and dynamics
• Identify factors that increase the potential for hostility occurring
• Examine and assess one’s own response patterns
• Develop verbal and nonverbal skills for responding constructively to hostility
• Explore techniques to effectively confront and set limits on hostile behaviours
• Develop awareness and skills for enhancing emotional and physical safety in hostile interactions

Kerry Palmer


Kerry is a Metis citizen from the Red River area of Manitoba. For the past 21 years Kerry has operated his consulting business, Integrative Mediation Services in the areas of conflict resolution, mediation, facilitation, training, team support and executive coaching. Kerry is an instructor at Justice Institute of BC in the Conflict Resolution, and Aboriginal Leadership Programs. As well, he instructs in the Bylaw and the Basic Security Professional training program. He has been part of the JI faculty for the past 20 years.

Kerry worked as a Child Protection mediator working under the Ministry of Justice for 14 years, and as a family mediator for 12 years. Currently he is a mediator for the BC Public Service Agency.

Kerry has certificates from the Justice Institute of BC in Conflict Resolution, Family Mediation and a specialization in Restorative Practices. He has also been a trainer with the International Institute of Restorative Practices in Family Group Conferencing. This training allowed him to work with the Penticton RCMP in a Youth Diversion Program where his role was in program development, as a trainer, and facilitator. Kerry also has a diploma from VCC in Adult Education.

Another area of Kerry’s work is within First Nations communities. Here Kerry has provided training, facilitation and mediation services to chief and council, professionals, and community members.

Kerry also works as a Respectful Workplace Advisor for a couple of Provincial Crown corporations in B.C. In this role he provides, Respectful Workplace training, mediation, team facilitation and workplace assessments.

HR Solution Workshop: Specialized Recruitment and Retention Tools for Non-Profits | LEADERSHIP
9:45 am - 11:45 am
with John Kay, MBA CPA |Principle Consultant, Realize Strategies
Workshop

One of the most pressing challenges for non-profits across all parts of British Columbia is hiring the right fit for your organization and retaining these professionals as they grow in their roles. This workshop will be led by two experienced consultants from Realize Strategies who specialize in working with non-profits and other purpose-driven organizations to recruit and retain talented leaders. The purpose of this workshop is to not only supply valuable information to participants, but also leave them with tools and strategies to align new practices with their culture and people.

Learning outcomes include:
• How can articulating organizational values help succession planning?
• How do you use cost effective in-house mentoring and other training/development approaches to help with staff retention and succession planning?
• How do you encourage staff to stay, grow, and move up within your organization?

John Kay, MBA CPA, Principle Consultant

Since 2012, John has guided Realize Strategies to become a leader in impact-driven strategy and executive search. He values innovative approaches to finding solutions and supporting impact-driven businesses to succeed in their missions. Prior to joining Realize, John held several senior positions in the private and public sectors both in Canada and abroad, including as the Chief Operating Officer of the WE Group of Companies where he led a $50-million values-driven business, and Executive Director of Corporate Development at the BC Ministry of Advanced Education. He also previously Chaired the boards of Fairtrade Canada and the British Columbia Co-operative Association, where he now serves as Treasurer. From 2010-2013, John held the position of both Director and Chair of the Finance Committee for Fairtrade International based in Germany.

Hoarding and Homelessness: Strategies for Intervention | ALL
9:45 am - 11:45 am
with Dr. Christiana Bratoitis |Associate Professor in the School of Social Work, UBC
Workshop

Participants will learn about the etiology, course and manifestations of hoarding as well as practical strategies for assessment and intervention, with a focus on harm reduction aimed at securing and preserving shelter and tenancy.

Dr. Christiana Bratiotis

Dr. Christiana Bratiotis is an Associate Professor in the School of Social Work at The University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, where she teaches social work practice classes across the bachelor’s and master’s programs and supervises social work doctoral students. She serves as Faculty Chair of the MSW program and currently leads a comprehensive curriculum renewal process. She pioneered work in the formation and operation of multi-disciplinary community hoarding task forces, which is highlighted in her book titled, “The Hoarding Handbook: A Guide for Human Service Professionals” published by Oxford University Press. She is the leading global authority on implementing community-based interventions for hoarding and her current research interests center on hoarding treatment and intervention efforts in the context of affordable housing and community-based organizations.

Transforming to a Housing Focused Shelter - Calgary Drop In | ALL
9:45 am - 11:45 am
with Kevin Webb | Manager of the Emergency Services at the Calgary Drop In Centre
Workshop

The Calgary Drop-In Centre (the DI) is a low barrier emergency shelter, serving Calgary’s most vulnerable. On an average night the DI has approximately 750 individuals sleeping in a single emergency shelter location that sees approximately 100 new individuals accessing services each month. The DI has made a commitment to assist individuals accessing services to find housing. This commitment was backed by an agency wide declaration and thoughtfully planned transformation to becoming a housing focused shelter. With this new philosophy, services, programs and policies are focused on individuals obtaining right fit housing as quickly as possible and avoiding extended shelter stays. Learn about the transformation to a housing focus shelter, resources available to help support the transformation, tools to assist individuals obtain housing, and outcomes that demonstrate how a housing focused shelter can move the needle on homelessness.

Kevin Webb

Kevin Webb is the Manager of the Emergency Services at the Calgary Drop In Centre and a key member of the DI’s transformation team. He is a member of the Canadian Shelter Transformation Network, Accredited Residential Property Manager and Master trainer for Ready to Rent. Kevin is currently working towards a BA in Leadership and is passionate about assisting people grow and develop professionally.

Lunch Buffet & Plenary
12:00 pm - 1:15 pm
Social

Regional Round Table Dialogue Session
1:30 pm - 3:15 pm
Facilitated by Diana Bulley

This facilitated dialogue session will bring together HSABC members and other community partners to explore current and emerging issues, available services, and solutions to addressing homelessness at the local, regional, and provincial level.

Facilitator: Diana Bulley

Diana is the founder and president of Ideaspace and is an award-winning communications professional with fifteen years experience in strategic communications, stakeholder and public engagement, behaviour change marketing and promotion, and community program development. She is recognized as a creative leader with broad experience researching, designing and executing innovative and dynamic campaigns and community programs, she brings specific expertise to her projects in the areas of housing, water and wastewater treatment, health and safety, sustainability, transportation, and equality and social justice.

Managing Hostile Interactions
1:30 pm - 5:00 pm
with Kerry Palmer**Limited spaces available**
Training

Service providers are aware of the challenges of dealing with upset, angry, frustrated and confused clients. Increasingly, one is presented with personally intimidating, hurtful hostile behaviour. Hostile incidents are clearly on the increase; dealing effectively with hostile individuals takes energy and the careful application of a specific range of skills. Unfortunately, it is much easier to intensify hostility than to defuse it. This 3.5 hour workshop will provide participants with proven strategies for managing hostile interactions in a manner that dramatically increases the likelihood of constructive resolution for all parties.

Principles and Values for This Course:
• The purpose of our workshops is to create change and action, not just knowledge
Experiential learning will be the foundation of the workshop
• Learning will be personal, relevant, and meaningful i.e. it will be about the practical issues and concerns that participants have with respect to their own workplace, work issues, and skills

Objectives:
Participants in this workshop will:
• Define hostility and examine its forms and dynamics
• Identify factors that increase the potential for hostility occurring
• Examine and assess one’s own response patterns
• Develop verbal and nonverbal skills for responding constructively to hostility
• Explore techniques to effectively confront and set limits on hostile behaviours
• Develop awareness and skills for enhancing emotional and physical safety in hostile interactions

Kerry Palmer


Kerry is a Metis citizen from the Red River area of Manitoba. For the past 21 years Kerry has operated his consulting business, Integrative Mediation Services in the areas of conflict resolution, mediation, facilitation, training, team support and executive coaching. Kerry is an instructor at Justice Institute of BC in the Conflict Resolution, and Aboriginal Leadership Programs. As well, he instructs in the Bylaw and the Basic Security Professional training program. He has been part of the JI faculty for the past 20 years.

Kerry worked as a Child Protection mediator working under the Ministry of Justice for 14 years, and as a family mediator for 12 years. Currently he is a mediator for the BC Public Service Agency.

Kerry has certificates from the Justice Institute of BC in Conflict Resolution, Family Mediation and a specialization in Restorative Practices. He has also been a trainer with the International Institute of Restorative Practices in Family Group Conferencing. This training allowed him to work with the Penticton RCMP in a Youth Diversion Program where his role was in program development, as a trainer, and facilitator. Kerry also has a diploma from VCC in Adult Education.

Another area of Kerry’s work is within First Nations communities. Here Kerry has provided training, facilitation and mediation services to chief and council, professionals, and community members.

Kerry also works as a Respectful Workplace Advisor for a couple of Provincial Crown corporations in B.C. In this role he provides, Respectful Workplace training, mediation, team facilitation and workplace assessments.

Working with Refugee Claimants | ALL
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Panelists: Members of MAP
Panel Discussion

As a result of Vancouver and the Lower Mainland’s housing market, refugee claimants have a difficult time finding somewhere to live. When they arrive they usually have very limited financial resources, can’t rely on income assistance straight away and so many of them experience housing stress within the first six months of arrival.

Fleeing their home countries and having endured psychological trauma, loss, extreme fatigue and fear for their personal safety, refugee claimants are in need of permanent and secure housing. Currently, there is a lack of all types of housing dedicated to refugee claimants: from short term shelter to transitional housing and permanent affordable housing for individuals and families in BC.

In this interactive session, led by the Multi-Agency Partnership (MAP) participants will be provided with an overview of who a refugee claimant is, and the challenges they face when arriving in BC. Participants will be provided with perspectives from refugee claimants, go along a journey that simulates arriving in Canada as a refugee claimant and will be provided tools and resources for you and your organization.

Grief and Loss, Bereavement Training for Professionals | ALL
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
with Victoria Hospice Society
Workshop

This session aims to promote awareness and understanding of loss and death and how it affects individuals. Participants will explore grief and bereavement issues as well as frameworks and coping strategies.

Victoria Hospice is a registered charity that has provided end-of-life care focused on palliative treatment since 1980. Their mission is to provide quality palliative end-of-life care for all through an interdisciplinary team of staff and volunteers who put patients and families first as they navigate their end-of life journey.

Victoria Hospice also engages in education, training and research to help improve outcomes for palliative patients. They have developed textbooks, evidence based clinical tools, practices, and courses to advance the field of palliative care across Canada.

Introduction to Psychological Health and Safety | LEADERSHIP
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
with Margaret Tebbutt, MA, Consultant, Workplace Initiatives and Trainer Canadian Mental Health Association, BC Division
Workshop

Learn how to promote mental health and address psychological health and safety in the workplace. This session includes an overview of the National Standard of Canada for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace, and a review of local policies and regulations. Workshop participants will explore resources, tools, and strategies developed in response to current and emerging legal requirements in Canada for the protection of employee mental health and the promotion of civility and respect at work.

Margaret Tebbutt

Margaret frequently presents at conferences on strategic approaches to psychological health and safety in the workplace, as well as delivering workshops to help managers and union leaders develop the knowledge and skills to more effectively deal with mental health issues.

As Senior Consultant to CMHA from 2005 – 2013, Margaret managed workplace initiatives such as Mental Health Works training, workplace-based integrated health screening and the national Bottom Line Conferences. Prior to 2005, she held positions as Senior Advisor, Executive Development for the University of British Columbia Sauder School of Business; Director, Client Service Delivery with Western Economic Diversification Canada; and in Canada’s foreign service at embassies abroad.

Margaret graduated from the University of Montpellier (France) with a Maïtrise ès letters (MA). She completed executive training through National Defence College, UBC Sauder School of Business, and the Canadian Centre for Executive Development.

Dinner Plenary with Keynote Jesse Thistle
5:00 pm - 7:30 pm
Relationships First Alongside Housing and Healthcare: A Touch of Home

Relationships First Alongside Housing and Healthcare: A Touch of Home


Jesse Thistle

Jesse Thistle is Métis-Cree from Saskatchewan and raised in Toronto. He is a Ph.D. Candidate in history at the York University, as his doctoral work on Metis road allowance communities has won the P.E. Trudeau and Vanier doctoral scholarships, and he is a governor general medalist. Jesse is the author of the Definition of Indigenous Homelessness in Canada published through the Canadian Observatory on Homelessness, and his historical research has been published in numerous academic journals, book chapters, and featured on CBC Ideas, CBC Campus, and Unreserved. His most recent work is a memoir published by Simon and Schuster entitled From the Ashes. You can follow him on Twitter at @Michifman .

7 am
8 am
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1 pm
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3 pm
Friday - September 27
Friday - September 27
Registration
7:00 am - 8:00 am

Registration opens at 7:00 am.

Breakfast Buffet and Plenary
8:00 am - 9:00 am
Plenary

Health and Homelessness Forum
9:00 am - 10:30 am

Persons experiencing homelessness have a disproportionate amount of acute and chronic illness when compared to the general population and encounter systemic barriers that may preclude them from seeking care and maintaining treatment adherence. Such complex health needs often act as a barrier to securing stable and appropriate shelter/housing, which can lead to a ‘revolving door’ of hospital admissions.

HSABC has recently completed a comprehensive two-year research and recommendations project called Supporting Partnerships between Health and Homelessness. With the support of partners from the Simon Fraser University Gerontology Research Centre and Providence Health Care, this project sought to provide a better understanding of the supports and mechanisms necessary to improve transitions from hospital to shelter/housing for persons experiencing homelessness.

Join this session to learn more about research findings and engage in meaningful conversations as we build on this area of work. This facilitated dialogue session will bring together members of health and homelessness sectors to share perspectives, improve understanding, and explore opportunities to move key recommendations forward.

Modular Housing: Strategies for Success | ALL
10:45 am - 12:00 pm
Panelists TBD
Panel Discussion

The Province is investing $291 million to build over 2,000 modular supportive housing units across B.C. for people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness. This initiative will deliver a mix of permanent and temporary units and is a response to the growing issue of homelessness in communities throughout B.C.

This interactive session will explore strategies, tips, lessons learned, and shared experiences that can help communities who are rolling out modular housing initiatives to successfully launch, tenant, and operate this type of programming.

This session will be moderated by the City of Vancouver’s Director of Homelessness Services, Celine Mauboules.

Dying with Dignity - Palliative Care in the Homelessness Sector | ALL
10:45 am - 12:00 pm
with Kelli Stajuhar, RN, PhD, FCAHS
Workshop

People who experience inequities such as homelessness and unstable housing, poverty, racialization, and stigmatization are underserved by current palliative care services. These populations are often diagnosed late when few treatment options are available, have few formal social supports, and lack financial resources and safe places to access care. As a result, many spend their final days in acute care or in the care of inner city workers who are highly skilled and compassionate, but have limited training and support to provide quality care at end-of-life.

This workshop will draw on a program of community-based research and experiences in working in the inner city to engage participants in conversations related to promising practices to improve access to quality palliative care. Highlight will include community initiatives underway in the homelessness sector to increase access to and quality of palliative care in Victoria, BC.

Dr. Kelli Stajduhar

Dr. Kelli Stajduhar, RN, PhD, FCAHS is a professor in the School of Nursing and Institute on Aging & Lifelong Health at the University of Victoria, research scientist with Fraser Health, and research affiliate with Island Health. She has worked in oncology, palliative care, and gerontology for almost 30 years as a practicing nurse, educator, and researcher. Her clinical work and research has focused on health service needs for those at the end-of-life and their families, and on the needs of marginalized and vulnerable populations. Dr. Stajduhar has 275+ academic publications and presentations. She is lead investigator on multiple research projects including international research collaboratives on family caregiving; projects evaluating the integration of a palliative approach in acute and residential care settings, and national studies on access to end-of-life care for structurally vulnerable populations and care experiences of caregivers providing palliative care in the home.

Student supervision is an important part of her research program working with undergraduate, Master’s, PhD, medical, and post-doctoral students. In the community, Dr. Stajduhar mentors clinical scientists and other highly qualified personnel in order to support engagement in research projects. Dr. Stajduhar is the recipient of numerous awards including the Craigdarroch Award of Excellence for Knowledge Mobilization, the Award of Excellence for Nursing Research from the College of Registered Nurses of BC and the Canadian Association of University School of Nursing, Academic of the Year from the Confederation of University Faculty Associations of BC, and Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences.

Resilient Minds: Building a Stronger and More Resilient First Responder Organization | ALL
10:45 am - 12:00 pm
with Steve Fraser | Captain of Mental Health and Wellness, Vancouver Fire and Rescue Services (VFRS)
Workshop

In 2016, Vancouver Fire and Rescue (VFRS) recognized the need for trauma-based resiliency training for firefighters. After an extensive search of available courses, team members from VFRS decided to partner with the local chapter of the Canadian Mental Health Association to develop the Resilient Minds program. This program engages and informs first responders in three crucial areas relevant to their work: trauma, mental health problems and building resiliency. Resilient Minds is based on CMHA’s ‘4R Action Toolkit’ to build skills needed to assist colleagues, family, or members of the public who may be struggling with a mental health problem or be in crisis. This engaging session will provide an overview of best practices and strategies to assist professionals in the homelessness serving sector.

Steve Fraser

Steve Fraser is the Captain of Mental Health and Wellness for Vancouver Fire and Rescue Services (VFRS) and the coordinator for VFRS Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) team. With over 22 years of experience in the fire service, he has taken his knowledge and expertise in the field and applied it to firefighter-specific programs, training, and education. Steve is the co-author of the Resilient Minds program collaborating with the Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA), Vancouver Fraser Branch.

Steve is an approved instructor for the International Critical Incident Stress Foundation and a certified Field Traumatologist with the Canadian Traumatology Institute. In addition to his work with VFRS, Steve is also a member with the BCPFFA (BC Professional Firefighter Association), Mental Health task force team. A team consisting of mental health professionals and firefighters, looking at best practices and programs to assist first responders. Steve is actively involved with nationwide research groups, collaborating with the University of Regina, University of PEI, Western, McMaster, Dalhousie and Firewell, a health and wellness community for firefighters. Through lived experiences, Steve brings a unique, empathetic, approach to the culture and issues faced with first responders.

In 2016 he received an outstanding achievement award with the City of Vancouver. In 2017, Steve was the proud recipient of the Firefighter of the Year award for Vancouver Fire and Rescue Service.

Lunch Buffet and Concluding Remarks
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Social

Strategies for Working with Aging Populations | ALL
1:15 pm - 2:30 pm
with Panelists TBD
Panel Discussion

A continued increase in the number of seniors accessing homelessness services presents unique challenges with Canada’s aging population as well as for health, housing, and community services providers. Older adults who are experiencing homelessness often require a wide range of supports due to declining physical health, increased mental health needs, and complex socioeconomic factors.

This session will facilitate engaging conversations around effective approaches to take when working with older clients presenting in shelter, drop in, and outreach settings. Subject matter experts will discuss ways to support the needs of seniors and share strategies for addressing challenges including age related cognitive decline, social isolation, community planning, service access/navigation, and provision of services to aging women.

This session will be moderated by Stephen D’Souza, HSABC’s new Executive Director.

Psychological First Aid | ALL
1:15 pm - 2:30 pm
with Provincial Overdose Mobile Response Team (MRT)
Workshop

Psychological First Aid (PFA) is a tool for enhancing resilience following a critical incident. PFA is designed as a supportive response to people who have experienced a traumatic or crisis event, are suffering, and might need support. It is not something only professionals can do, it's designed for use by non-mental health professionals and puts the focus on listening to someone's needs and concerns in order to provide the appropriate practical and emotional support. PFA delivered quickly and appropriately has been shown to significantly reduce psychological distress from a traumatic event.

The Provincial Overdose Mobile Response Team (MRT)

The Provincial Overdose Mobile Response Team (MRT) offers short-term psychosocial support to frontline workers and first responders working on the frontline of overdose public health emergency in British Columbia. This includes people impacted by critical incidents such as overdoses and/or deaths during the course of their work. MRT is funded by the BC Ministry of Health and BC Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions in recognition of the psychosocial impact of the overdose public health emergency,and offer free and confidential supports/services. MRT was created with support from the BC Ministry of Health and BC Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions in recognition of the psychosocial impact of the overdose public health emergency on first responders, frontline workers and people with lived experience/peers.

Build Homes not Barriers-Strategies for Dealing with Community Opposition | ALL
1:15 pm - 2:30 pm
Panelists BC Housing, BCNPHA, and HSABC
Panel Discussion

Build Homes not Barriers (BCNPHA + HSABC) and BC Housing's Community Acceptance of Non-Market Housing Toolkit

The recent historic investments in affordable housing will have a significant impact in tackling homelessness and responding to housing need in communities throughout BC. However, in some communities, these much-needed projects face substantial barriers as they move through the municipal approval process. From Penticton to Langley, Gibsons to Fort St. John, fears, perpetuated myths and complicated public consultation processes have contributed to divisive discourse on social media and in open houses across BC.

Panellists will provide highlights on the work being done including an overview of BC Housing's new toolkit: Community Acceptance of Non-Market Housing. The session will also provide an opportunity to work in small groups to activate the toolkit and take away techniques that can apply to your community when you return home.

Presenters: BC Housing, BCNPHA and HSABC